Last year a captivating show about dino hunting in northern Wyoming and southern Montana aired for the first time. It showed how ranchers, who are living on the edge in that part of the country, are making ends meet and perhaps could make it rich as they dig up dinosaur bones on their own property.

Millions of years ago the region we now call The West was much different than it is now. The area was wet and tropical. Massive creatures roamed the land.

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When one of these creatures died, if their body fell into the right stuff, it might be preserved through the fossilization process. This is much like a natural cement forming around the dead animal. In most cases, this happened after the body was already picked clean by predators, bugs, and any other organic life that would eat away at its flesh. In most cases, just the bones were left.

Other organic materials, such as plants, organic marsh goop, trees, and bugs ended up farther underground. Immense heat and pressure known as the coalification process turned that stuff into the coal we dig up today.

 

Back up on the surface; millions of years later, through rain and wind erosion, the "cement casing" begins to dissolve and bones reveal themselves. Wyoming ranchers have learned to spot them. When they find something that looks good they pause ranching and start digging.

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A bone here or there can bring in hundreds of dollars. Something more or something rare can bring in thousands. Enough of a skeleton can bring in hundreds of thousands of dollars. Some finds can bring in MILLIONS!

These folks need to save their ranches. They are hoping for that big find.

Season 2 of Dino Hunters is now available for streaming on Discovery Channel. The trailer is below.

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Season one left viewers wondering about some of the important finds these ranchers turned paleontologists have found.

Will they be able to sell the most complete T-Rex, Named Cowboy Rex, that has ever been found?

Besides watching these ranchers discover fascinating finds you'll also learn more about what once walked the Earth than you ever thought you could know. These ranchers have educated themselves to the point that any one of them could teach a college course. Some of them should receive honorary degrees.

It's fascinating to watch how they know where the bones are. How they dig. How they preserver what are at times crumbling bones. Then how they try to sell them.

I was worried that season 2 might not make it. I'm glad the producers decided to continue the series.

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