The video below will show you, if you are ever being chased by a bear, DO NOT climb a tree to try to get away from him.

This is a video of a bear climbing as fast as he can to get away from a bigger bear. You'll see that both bears are great climbers.

It was a black bear that came across a much bigger brown bear. The black bear considered himself outmatched from the moment the two laid eyes on each other.

Up the tree, the two go. They climb fast, REALLY FAST.

It's almost like they are running up the tree. Keep watching. You'll see the race up the tree pause a few times then begin again.

The brown bear, who is the aggressor, in this case, was a lady bear who had cubs. That is probably the key to this story.

DO NOT mess with a Mama bear who has cubs with her. She will not tolerate it.

We have to wonder at this point, how can animals that are so big climb so high and so fast at the same time. It seems unreal.

So if you can't climb a tree what can you do?

Here’s what the experts say:

running bear
Drew Kirby/CAnva
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If you encounter a grizzly, do not run.
Avoid direct eye contact.
Walk away slowly, if the bear is not approaching.
If the bear charges, stand your ground (you cannot outrun it).
Don’t scream or yell. Speak in a soft monotone voice and wave your arms.
If you have pepper spray, prepare to use it.
If the grizzly charges to within 25 feet of where you’re standing, use the spray.
If the animal makes contact, curl up into a ball on your side, or lie flat on your stomach.
Try not to panic; remain as quiet as possible until the attack ends.
While in bear country, be aware that you may encounter a bear at any time.
Be sure the bear has left the area before getting up to seek help.

Watch this guy and do what he did.

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How do you talk to a bear as you slowly, nervously, back away?

Hey bear! It's okay.

Hey bear. It's okay.

Was he saying that for the bear's sake or his own?

You can watch in the video below as the nervous man backs slowly away.

A curious bear zigzags between the trees, watching the human.

In the man's hand, you'll see he is holding something that is pointed at the bear. That is a bottle of bear spray.

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Woah Bear

Hey bear.

Hey, get out of here.

I'm leaving.

But the bear keeps sniffing and following him.

The man is smart enough to keep as many trees between him and the bear as he can. No need to be in the open spaces should the bear try to charge.

Still, at this point, the bear just seems curious.

Just when the man thinks he has put a little distance between him and the bear, the big guy trots a little bit and gets a bit too close.

Hey bear! It's okay.

Hey bear. It's okay.

HEY! HEY!

Now the bear is getting TOO close.

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At one point the bear almost seems playful as it runs to a tree and climbs partway up it. It hangs on up there and looks at the man from above.

GET OFF THERE!

GET OFF THERE!

I guess the tree-climbing stunt made the man nervous.

But the second time the bear runs and climbs a tree the man takes it as a sign that the bear maybe just wants to play.

Good bear.

That's a good bear.

Just stay up here.

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Finally, the seemly curious and playful bear gets a little too close.

The nervous man shoots a squirt of bear spray out.

I'll let you watch the video to see what happens next.

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