He had found the love of his life and the perfect setting to pop the question. However, a bighorn sheep in Glacier National Park had different plans entirely.

I found this love story on YouTube today. Here's how the guy described his "plans" and how he nearly got photobombed by a bighorn:

During the 14-mile hike on Highline pass, we found a beautiful clearing. When we set up the tripod to take 'pictures' I started recording a video. As I mustered up the courage to pop the question, Shanna suddenly pointed to something out of view of the camera. Next thing you know a big horned sheep appeared and came within feet of both of us. It ended up laying down in the grass a few feet away. After composing myself I found the courage to pop the question in one of the most beautiful places we could imagine. Onlookers clapped and cheered for us as they passed by on their hike.

Her reaction to the surprise visitor right before "the moment" is precious.

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Imagine seeing this big boy coming across your path as you're probably already nervous to pop the question.

ViralHog via YouTube

Spoiler Alert: She said yes.

ViralHog via YouTube

Congrats to the happy couple who are now man and wife and high-fives (or hooves?) to the bighorn sheep who is now a video star.

LOOK: Stunning vintage photos capture the beauty of America's national parks

Today these parks are located throughout the country in 25 states and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The land encompassing them was either purchased or donated, though much of it had been inhabited by native people for thousands of years before the founding of the United States. These areas are protected and revered as educational resources about the natural world, and as spaces for exploration.

Keep scrolling for 50 vintage photos that show the beauty of America's national parks.

RANKED: Here are the most popular national parks

To determine the most popular national parks in the United States, Stacker compiled data from the National Park Service on the number of recreational visits each site had in 2020. Keep reading to discover the 50 most popular national parks in the United States, in reverse order from #50 to #1. And be sure to check with individuals parks before you visit to find out about ongoing, pandemic-related safety precautions at www.nps.gov/coronavirus.