Both of Wyoming's senators, Cynthia Lummis and John Barrasso, have voted against the passing the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act, which passed the Senate 65-33, and has been signed into law.

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The bill passed by the Senate would, among other things, improve federal background checks, close the boyfriend loophole, provide $750 million for the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant, and give $15 billion for various other services including mental health services and school security.

Lummis has posted to her Facebook page part of her reasoning for opposing the recent bill.

Lummis said:

"The Uvalde shooting was tragic and my heart goes out to all of the family members impacted by that horrific event. I was hopeful the Senate would act to prevent these kinds of tragedies in the future by addressing mental health issues and ways to make our schools safer, something I would wholeheartedly support. However, this legislation includes measures that infringe on the Second Amendment rights of lawfully abiding gun owners in Wyoming - something I will always oppose."

Barrasso put out a press release before final passage of the bill detailing why he was voting against the bill.

Barrasso said:

"I do not support this legislation and will continue to vote against it. As a senator for Wyoming, I know the meaning of the Second Amendment. I will not vote for any legislation that would jeopardize the Second Amendment rights of law-abiding citizens. My focus has been on mental health, school safety, and better enforcement of our current laws. This legislation goes beyond that," Barrasso said. "What happened in Uvalde, Buffalo, and other communities across the country is heartbreaking. We want our children to be safe in school. We want parents to feel safe sending their kids to school. I will continue working in a bipartisan way to address our nation’s mental health crisis and to make schools safer."

Barrasso is instead in favor of a bill proposed by Texas Senator Ted Cruz, co-sponsored by Lummis, The Safe Kids, Safe Schools, Safe Communities Act, which would, among other things, increase funding to the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, increase the punishement for smuggling guns into the U.S., and reallocate American Rescue Plan funding to mental health services.

While Lummis is not supporting the most recent bill, she is a co-sponsor of the Safe Schools Act, along with Barrasso, which would allow schools to use federal funding for additional law enforcement, reinforced doors, or security cameras.

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